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 GENERAL RECYCLING GUIDE 

 
 

Lets see whatís in the Bin.

 

It's not hard to see a good waste system is simply separating out the different materials and having dedicated disposal routes for each type. The goal should be to make recycling so easy and automatic that it blends into the flow of everyday life, achieving a massive reduction in waste materials that are just thrown away.

 

Removal of organics
Once you have achieved 100% removal of all organic matter from your rubbish bin, you no longer have rubbish, you have a mixture of lots of different materials varying in value. A good start is to avoid mixing organics, in this case food waste, with other items in the first place. So all compostable food waste collect in a kitchen bucket awaiting to be composted. Anything that has contained food needs to be washed out, glass jars, food bottles, beer bottles, plastic milk containers, plastic drinks bottles, food cans and drinks
cans, anything having been in contact with food must be cleaned. Store the recyclables outside, youíll find they no longer smell like rubbish, making them more pleasant to handle. Now we can start thinking of them as a valuable resource.

 

Glass. storage and disposal
UK. Little picture. Glass 7.5% of your waste.
Big picture. Over 2 million tonnes produced annually, with a 22% national recycling rate.
After use wash bottles and jars, using old washing up water, theirs no need to soak paper labels off as the recycling process uses temperatures that deal with the labels. Dispose at your local Bottle Bank recycling point.

 

Plastics. storage and disposal
UK. little picture. Plastics make up 10% of your waste.
The Big picture. Over 3.5 million tonnes produced annually 2.5 million tonnes becomes waste, national recycling rate 5%.

The first task is to familiarize yourself with the many difference plastic compositions commonly in use today. The three main plastics of interest are labeled 01, 02 and 04, inside recycle triangles. 01 is PET and commonly used for fizzy drinks containers like, Coke Pepsi & lemonade. 02 is HDPE as used in milk containers and some  

cosmetics containers like shampoos and 04 is LPDE the commonly used plastic bag. After use wash out each container, using old washing up water, and reduce by cutting in half this will enable effective storage until disposal by local recycling collection or delivery to a recycling collection point. Remove container lids (often made from different compounds) spray pumps, bottles that contained petroleum based products (e.g., motor oil), pesticides or herbicides. General rule no plastics without a neck or screw-on lid.

 

Metals. storage and disposal
UK. little picture. Steel and aluminum cans make up 8% of your waste.
The Big picture. An estimated 5 billion aluminum cans produced annually, with 36% national recycling rate. No. Soil is the foremost layer of the earth, and is composed of various proportions of sand, silt, clay, and small amounts of organic material. Rich soil containing compost typically outperforms other soil types.
4000 tonnes of aluminum foil is used yearly,

 with 10% nationally recycled and 11 billion steel cans produced annually, with 16% nationally recycled. After use wash out cans and tins, using old washing up water, reduce with a can crusher or by crushing under foot. Aerosol cans must be empty, do not crush
pressurized aerosol cans. Test cans magnetically to separate steel from aluminum, add washed and folded aluminum foil and food trays to the aluminum cans. Store until disposal by local
recycling collection or delivery to a recycling collection point. No need to remove paper labels from the steel food cans as the recycling process uses temperatures that deal with the labels. Scrap metals, remove any rubber, plastic or other foreign materials. Keep to small 
manageable items by weight, large items need to be disposed off at your local recycling center, try and separate metals by their types ie: Brass, Copper, Steel and Aluminum.

 

Paper. storage and disposal
UK. little picture. Paper and cardboard makes up 38% of your household waste.
The Big picture. Over 6 million tonnes produced annually, with reclaimed paper fibre representing 65% paper and board 

produce in the UK. 

Lets divide the paper and cardboard into separate categories.

Plain paper (without a gloss coloured finish) plain A4 office paper, writing paper, envelopes.
Depending on quantity store majority of paper separate from cardboard until disposal at your local recycling collection point. Can be shredded for composting or pre-soaked and used in a wormery. Remember to remove any plastics such as envelope windows and self-adhesive strips.

Gloss paper (paper with gloss coloured finish) junk mail, leaflets and magazines separate from the cardboard and dispose of at your local recycling collection point.               jjj 
Newspapers Depending on quantity store majority of newspapers separate from the cardboard until disposal at your local recycling collection point. An abundant source and excellent recycling collection point. Can be 
shredded for composting or pre-soaked and used in a wormery. Remember to remove any plastics such as envelope windows and self-adhesive strips. carbon rich material shredded or pre-soaked for composting and used in the wormery. Shredded its an ideal material for worm bedding Can be used for a can-o-worms moisture mat, just open out a newspaper, cut to fit, soak and place over food scraps to exclude light and encourage worms to feed at the surface. jjjjjjj
Large cardboard boxes
Flatten to reduce size, store and feed into the well established recycling industry by local collection or delivery to a recycling collection point.                                                  jjjjjjjjjj
Low grade cardboard (non coloured) egg cartons, paper tissue rolls, pizza boxes and general packing. An ideal material for wormery and compost bin providing the carbon rich feed 
from an urban environment. Excessive amounts are best recycled.                          Coloured cardboard               (cardboard with a coloured exterior) food cartons, cereal boxes. If contaminated with organic matter, shred and compost. Multi-layered  normally food cartons with

 a plastic water- proof layer, milk cartons, Cardboard mixed with other materials are non-recyclable and need to be disposed of in the normal waste bin, cut up to reduce.

 

Wood 
Compost scrap wood ensuring only well aged soft wood, like old pine, enters the compost pile. It must be completely chipped. An extremely rich carbon source, mix well with high
nitrogen materials and keep moist . Avoid new treated woods they contain some very nasty compounds. Should be used as a bulking agent to enable ventilation through the pile and then removed by sieving. No. Soil is the foremost layer of the earth, and is composed of various proportions 
of sand, silt, clay, and small amounts of organic material. Rich soil containing compost typically outperforms other soil types.

 

Food scraps and vegetable peelings 
Very important compost and wormery ingredients.

      JJJJJJJJJ     Take a look at this useful tool

 

Only common items found in a typical rubbish bin have been covered, information is given as a quick guide only.

 

Recycling Tips 
1.  Process waste you make it, donít allow it to accumulate and become a problem. 
2.  Store collected recyclables for a month to minimizing trips to your local recycling point. Try to include your recycled materials disposal with other journeys like shopping.
3.  Have plenty of extra containers and bins available. 
4.  Start by keeping organics away from all other materials, this will mean starting your composting first. 
5.  If using a single composting bin, during winter when the composting process naturally slows down, use your composter to store kitchen organic waste mixed with shredded cardboard. Start collecting and preparing the brown material while its more abundant, storing and keeping it dry. When wormer months arrive and the green composting material flourishes make your perfect mix and start a new hot batch.
6.  Use your household wastewater wisely. Washing out used cans, plastic and glass containers in dirty washing up or bath water.
7.  Separate and store materials by type ie; Organics, Metal, Paper, Glass and Plastics. Then subdivide into their relevant smaller sections ready for disposal.
8.  Unwanted furniture can be passed on to community groups and low income families via a network of household furniture projects, most of these are small scale local projects, traceable through your local authority. 
9.  To reduce the space, stored plastic materials occupy, cut a plastic container to form an open top container and store cut up strips of plastic inside. Remember to store plastic by its compound type. 
10.  Check your disposal routes before you begin.
11.  Think before you place any item in the waste bin.
12.  Old clothes/shoes in good condition should be taken to your nearest high street charity shop such as Oxfam and Age concern etc, your unwanted clothing will help the homeless or be sent abroad. Even damaged un-wearable items can be returned, as charities have profitable disposal routes for these, if youíre too embarrassed then use the clothing banks at the recycling centre ensuring to tie the shoes in pairs.
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3. Think before you purchase any items, sensible buying can reduce the amount or type of packaging brought into your household, thereby reducing the amount of waste from the starting point; ie buy carbonated drinks in easy to crush, store and recycle aluminum cans and not the widely used P.E.T. plastic containers, as these are awkward to store and have virtually no residual value to encourage recycling.

 

Remember the three R's Reduce, Reuse and Recycle.